Even though pirates haven’t lived there for quite some time now, the pirate cemetery of Madagascar and its surrounding islands remain a popular location for adventure-seekers around the world, both due to its vibrant history, as well as natural beauty. Since it was re-discovered in 2000, it has become one of Île Sainte-Marie’s favorite tourist attractions. This place was not far from the maritime routes along which ships returning from the East Indies sailed in transit, their holds overflowing with wealth, it was provided with bays and inlets protected from storms and finally, it had abundant fruit and was situated in quiet waters. I thought you might like to see a cemetery for Pirate Cemetery of Madagascar I found on Findagrave.com. It’s completely unique and worth the effort. However, dead pirates or not, this cemetery is one of Madagascar’s most popular tourist destinations. The pirate cemetery is worth going to. Access is via an isolated foot track, which crosses several tidal creeks and slippery logs about 10 minutes south of the causeway. Photo by Lemurbaby CC BY-SA 3.0. The cemetery overlooks the Baie de Forbans just south of Ambodifotatra, the perfect pirate hang-out. Pirates of the likes of Adam Baldrige, who was one of the founders of the Île Sainte-Marie settlement, as well as legendary William Kidd, whose exploits were featured in many stories and myths, including one written by Edgar Alan Poe himself, all held claims of burying their retirement funds somewhere around the island. William Kidd, privateer, 18th century portrait by Sir James Thornhill. The crumbling piers used for ship repairs are visible from here, as is the small island of Île aux Forbans, where many pirates lived. Ile Sainte-Marie was the off-season home of an estimated 1,000 pirates. Photo by Antony Stanley CC BY-SA 2.0. For around 100 years, Ile Sainte-Marie was the off-season home of an estimated 1,000 pirates. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Ile Sainte-Marie (or St. Mary’s Island as it is known in English), a long, thin island off the eastern African coast, became a popular base for pirates. The crumbling cemetery, its graves half covered by tall, swaying grass, is open to the public. Jun 22, 2016 David Goran. Each crew displayed their distinguishable flag in front of or atop their wooden huts. You would never need to go back. The pirate cemetery of Madagascar is the final resting place for various buccaneers, corsairs and sea marauders who amassed unimaginable wealth by robbing merchants across the oceans during the Golden Age of Piracy in the 17th and 18th century. We’ve updated the security on the site. The cemetery is surrounded with coconut palms. Please enter your email address and we will send you an email with a reset password code. Since the island was so favored by pirates, becoming their home away from home, those who fell during raids or died from other causes were often buried in the cemetery that remains the only testimony of their presence on the island. The Pirate Cemetery. 5 Animals to Spot on a Night Walk in Andasibe, Spotlight On: Sea Turtles of Madagascar for World Turtle Day. SHARE: Facebook Twitter: In the 17th and 18th centuries, Ile Sainte-Marie (or St. Mary’s Island as it is known in English), a long, thin island off the eastern African coast, became a popular base for pirates. Photos larger than 8.0 MB will be reduced. Please check your email and click on the link to activate your account. I can unsubscribe any time using the unsubscribe link at the end of all emails. A recently discovered map from 1733 by John de Bry, an archaeologist working on shipwrecks in the area, called the land mass the “Island of Pirates” and identified the location of three pirate ship wrecks.